Why World AIDS Day Matters to Me

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Today, December 1st, is World AIDS Day. AIDS has personally impacted our family because some of my children were orphaned due to AIDS. HIV (which is not the same as AIDS) affects our family every day because some of our children live with HIV Рand live well, I might add. With proper medical care and truly life-saving medications. we expect our  children with HIV to have long and healthy lives. 

One of my friends, Jodie Howerton, is responsible for a huge project creating current HIV educational videos for school children. You can read about her project on the Redefine+ website. You can also view the first video (9 minutes) in the series, which will give you a quick opportunity to update your knowledge about HIV.

You can also read a great post by my friend, Erin Henderson, who personally walked me through the process of adopting a child with HIV back in the early days when it was all new.

A number of years ago I worked with some other moms of HIV+ children through a small non-profit. From HIV to Home no longer exists, but I have an HIV fact page with information that was developed for our (now closed) website and provides great information on the facts of HIV.

I probably shouldn’t leave my most important thought to the end, but that’s how this is wrapping up. I want you to know that, in my opinion, stigma is the most serious complication faced by many people living with HIV. Stigma hurts and divides people, it causes them to live in secrecy which results in shame.¬†As the mom of HIV+ children, this breaks my heart. Please educate yourself and your children out of love for others.

By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another. John 13:35

Far less weighty, but still important to mention, today is the last day to enter my¬†giveaway for a beautiful outdoor nativity set. I will draw the winner tonight at 9:00 PST. I can’t wait to see which one of you will win!

Have a great Monday, friends.

Lisa

 

 

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Let me introduce myself. Russ and I are the parents of twelve children by birth and adoption, and sometimes more through foster care. I'm the creator of One Thankful Mom which has been as much of a gift to me as to my readers. In 2011 I became a TBRI¬ģ Pracitioner* and have lived and breathed connected parenting ever since. I'm deeply honored to be the co-author, together with the late Dr. Karyn Purvis, of The Connected Parent; it is her final written work. I love speaking at events for adoptive and foster parents. I'm also the co-founder of The Adoption Connection, a podcast and resource site for adoptive moms. I mentor and encourage adoptive moms so you can find courage and hope in your journeys of loving your children well.

10 Comments

  1. Luann Yarrow Doman
    December 1, 2014

    People like you are the reason I have hope. I also blogged about HIV-AIDS today. It's amazing how much ignorance there still is when information is readily available. As Christians, I believe we have the responsibility to disseminate truth in whatever sphere of influence we have and work hard to end the stigma.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      December 1, 2014

      Thank you, Luann. Please feel free to share the link to your post so we can read it.

      Reply
  2. Alex
    December 2, 2014

    Thank you! My husband asked me what World AIDS Day meant to me, yesterday. So much of it was about unnecessary loss of life and stigma. For me, I have some relatives I will never meet because their lives were cut short. I'm thankful the stigma is not what it once was. Yet, there is a long way to go. I am thankful, in this country, it is rare to be born HIV+, but sad that many children around the world are still born with the virus. Thank you for the resources and for sharing your heart.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      December 2, 2014

      Alex, thanks for commenting. The loss of life is still staggering in so many countries – heartbreaking when we know what medication could do for people.

      Reply
  3. jesswiederholt
    December 2, 2014

    Very well written, Lisa! Thank you for continuing to educate on HIV and stigma!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      December 2, 2014

      Thanks for the comment, Jess.

      Reply
  4. Wilson Prabu
    December 3, 2014

    This is wonderful Lisa, My wife and I are involved with HIV positive children and adult for the last 18 years in Chennai, India. Wonderful to read your article.
    Blessings!
    Wilson and Elzy

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      December 3, 2014

      Thank you so much for your comment, Wilson. Blessings on your work in India.

      Reply
  5. Julie
    December 3, 2014

    Back around 2009, your blog (and other links/resources) helped us understand and consider adoption of children living with HIV. Info/experience was then limited here in Canadian adoption circles. We currently have 2 sons from Asia living with this "non-issue". Thanks and blessings!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      December 3, 2014

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me, Julie! That makes my day.

      Reply

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