What Could be Good about Brokenness?

 

Last night Hannah and I went to her church where the worship was beautiful, a baptism made me cry, and the sermon spoke straight to my heart. It was so intensely perfect that I took three pages of  notes.

One point keeps circling through my mind. There is a purpose in God using us, broken people Рhis cracked pots Рto store the treasure of the Gospel of Christ. When the container is cracked Р people can see the contents, and when we are filled with the hope of Jesus, we reveal our greatest treasure.

I have to pause because I really want you to picture this in your mind. Can you see it?

I don’t know about you, but my pot is broken; there are some large cracks that have become gaping holes over the last years. I’m tempted to patch them up, or at least turn the side with the most brokenness to the wall, but if I do, the glory of God will not be revealed as fully in my life.

I need to sit with this for awhile and let it soak deeply into me.

Pastor Jason Meyer said that we should never be ashamed of our brokenness,  because we are not ashamed of the Gospel.

What do you think? Can our brokenness allow Jesus to shine all the more brightly into the world?

But we have this treasure in jars of clay, to show that the surpassing power belongs to God and not to us. We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our bodies. 2 Corinthians 4: 7-10

If you would like to read/watch/listen to the complete sermon, “God’s Power in Cracked Pots,” you should be able to find it on the Bethlehem Baptist website¬†soon.

Lisa

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Let me introduce myself. Russ and I are the parents of twelve children by birth and adoption, and sometimes more through foster care. I'm the creator of One Thankful Mom which has been as much of a gift to me as to my readers. In 2011 I became a TBRI¬ģ Pracitioner* and have lived and breathed connected parenting ever since. I'm deeply honored to be the co-author, together with the late Dr. Karyn Purvis, of The Connected Parent; it is her final written work. I love speaking at events for adoptive and foster parents. I'm also the co-founder of The Adoption Connection, a podcast and resource site for adoptive moms. I mentor and encourage adoptive moms so you can find courage and hope in your journeys of loving your children well.

16 Comments

  1. Katie Szotkiewicz Patel
    September 16, 2013

    Excellent word for today!!

    Reply
  2. Wendy
    September 16, 2013

    Yes, and yes, and yes! This paradox is both our joy and our dread as believers. And herein (much to our dismay) lies the power of our ministry…allowing the broken, gaping, ragged, wounded, missing places to show; they ARE the glory, for they are Christ's canvas to showcase His restoration and grace. Here is where true healing begins – for us and for others.
    On behalf of all of us who heave a sigh of relief at your transparency because it helps us afford our own transparency, thank you. I see you, and you are beautiful.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      September 16, 2013

      Wendy, my friend, thank you. This image is so powerful to me – in all of its raw beauty.

      Reply
  3. Emily
    September 16, 2013

    Liiiiisaaaaaaa. I needed to read this this morning, but I really would have preferred a post about, "Good news, if you wait long enough Jesus makes everything easy and not painful!"

    ūüėČ

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      September 16, 2013

      Or how about this, "If you spackle it up really quickly nobody will notice, and then if you can just pretend you aren't broken at all, everything will be okay." Right? Glad you liked it Emily.

      Reply
  4. shelley
    September 16, 2013

    love love love. i need to let this sink in. thanks lisa

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      September 16, 2013

      It really is a beautiful image, isn't it. Good to hear from you, Shelley!

      Reply
  5. Rachel Rausch
    September 16, 2013

    that is beautiful. and true.

    Reply
  6. Luann Yarrow Doman
    September 16, 2013

    Love this. True wisdom right here. I appreciate your honesty about life and adoption.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      September 16, 2013

      Thank you, Luann. I'm glad you found this helpful too – good stuff from Jason Meyer.

      Reply
  7. Alyce Bechtel Zimmerman
    September 16, 2013

    Thank you Lisa! Rachel – thank you for sharing this link. I pray that both of you have a day filled with blessings.

    Reply
  8. Hannah Jasmine Tucker
    September 16, 2013

    Thank you so much for this.

    Reply
  9. Delmar N Rachel Weaver
    September 16, 2013

    Thanks for sharing, Lisa! Definitely needed to read this today!

    Reply
  10. Afton Frazier
    September 16, 2013

    This definitely blessed me today. Thank you, Mrs. Qualls.

    Reply
  11. Mary Andrews
    September 16, 2013

    On the other hand, when Jesus heals some of those cracks with His love for us, others see our scars and are offered hope for the healing of their own brokenness, hope that life will be a blessing and they can then reach out to help others by being Christ's hands. Does this make any sense?

    Reply
    1. Lisa Qualls
      September 16, 2013

      I can see that too, Mom, thanks for that thought. Love you.

      Reply

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