“We’ll Have the Coffee Pot On”

Tomorrow morning we are visiting a couple that does respite for children in our community. They are professional respite providers, but I definitely get the sense that they do it as ministry and out of love for struggling children. They also provide respite for children in fostercare. We’re going to take the youngest five and visit them on their farm. Linda wrote, “Bring as many kids as you like,” and “We’ll have the coffee pot on.” Yep, I’m pretty sure we’re going to love them.

I have time for a quick update this morning before heading to Spokane, and then to Couer d’Alene.  Russ is working from home, so the two little boys won’t need to spend the hours from 8:00 – 3:00 in the car, and waiting at their sisters’ appointments.  Ladybug and Sunshine will see the orthodontist, then after lunch, Dimples will see her new therapist and begin EMDR today.

We’ll race home in time for Dimples’ friends to arrive after school to play games, decorate cupcakes, and celebrate her birthday – not exactly a birthday party, just friends coming over to have fun.  She woke up at 7:00, already anxious about the candy she chose as prizes, worried about having enough food for her family dinner on Sunday, and wondering when I am going to buy the doughnuts she wants to take to her class on Monday.  It could be a very long weekend.

The Book Group discussion of The Whole-Brain Child has begun on our Goodreads site.  If you’ve already signed up, stop by and join the conversation.  We’ll continue to discuss Chapter One: Parenting with the Brain in Mind until next Thursday when we’ll begin Chapter Two.  If you haven’t signed up, you can still join us.  Email me at lisa@onethankfulmom.com and I’ll send you an invitation.

Have a great Friday, friends.  If you think of me, please pray that Dimples will do well as we spend the day on the road.

[This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.]

 Lisa

This post may contain Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Let me introduce myself. Russ and I are the parents of twelve children by birth and adoption, and sometimes more through foster care. I'm the creator of One Thankful Mom which has been as much of a gift to me as to my readers. In 2011 I became a TBRI® Pracitioner* and have lived and breathed connected parenting ever since. I'm deeply honored to be the co-author, together with the late Dr. Karyn Purvis, of The Connected Parent; it is her final written work. I love speaking at events for adoptive and foster parents. I'm also the co-founder of The Adoption Connection, a podcast and resource site for adoptive moms. I mentor and encourage adoptive moms so you can find courage and hope in your journeys of loving your children well.

9 Comments

  1. Lisa H.
    October 26, 2012

    Praying!

    Reply
  2. Heidi
    October 26, 2012

    Praying, Lisa, for this day and the weekend.

    Reply
  3. Acceptance with Joy
    October 26, 2012

    I am interested in what you do for respite. I am learning that through Department of Developmental Delays one or two of my children may be eligible for 20 hours a month of respite, but it must be in-home. Which, I am not sure how to work with. If we are needing respite… and I am a homebody seeking peace and quiet in my own home for me and the rest of the family … having the respite in the house doesn't seem quite like the answer. I am thinking I will need to find respite that I pay for to get what we need, but I'm not even sure who, and how much to pay, etc… It's new and foreign to me. I doubt if I ever paid a babysitter in my life. We always traded with friends. BUT this is so different.

    Reply
    1. Rachel
      October 26, 2012

      Hi — I have personally provided respite for families with developmental/behavioural needs through a program here in Canada called "Special Services at Home" through the Victoria Order of Nurses… the at home does not mean that the support worker needs to be IN your home the whole time — although sometimes it does work that way here.

      I provided care for 3 years to a family whose pre-teen daughter with Down Syndrome had issues in the morning with morning routine and getting ready for school, etc… her behaviours were affecting the entire family… I would come in to the house in the morning — while everyone else was asleep still to wake her up, lay out her clothes, help her wake up, shower (about every other day), dress, eat breakfast and get ready for school… it was a constant battle/struggle for them before I came — but she needed that individualized attention that the mom was too busy with the other children to provide. I was there for about 2 hours every morning which translated to 10 hours/week.

      However other clients I provided care for were on week-ends — maybe a Saturday for 6 hours — I would pick the child up from his parents house, and we would go to the park, or to my house to make cookies/play games, sometimes we would go shopping (something he could never do with his parents since he was so uncontrollable) but he loved it — the difference when WE went shopping it was not for anything in particular — more like window shopping so he could see and wander… whereas his parents when they went shopping would be with a purpose and his behaviour would leave everyone frustrated and nothing would be accomplished.

      I have babysat a lot — but providing respite is different — with babysitting it is including the child in MY day, come over — hang out — and I can still get my laundry done and supper made — Respite to me is different – respite in my head is becoming part of HIS/HER day and I do not need to accomplish anything else — no other distractions. As a parent it is impossible to give that type of attention to a child since that is not 'real' life — there is always something else that is on the to-do list (like laundry and supper — which at times does not feel like big distractions/accomplishments but they can be).

      Reply
      1. Acceptance with Joy
        October 27, 2012

        Rachel,

        Thank you!!!

        THIS HELPS ME A LOT!! Thank you for taking the time to write. I am grateful and will work towards getting us some respite. blessings, angela

        Reply
  4. Ellen
    October 26, 2012

    Praying for grace for her and joy for you.

    Reply
  5. Tricia
    October 26, 2012

    I think all communities need respite providers – what a great way to support adoptive families in the journey! Hope your day and weekend are life giving.

    Reply
  6. Joelle
    October 27, 2012

    Seeking respite care is such a win win because not only does the family get a needed break but the respite provider is blessed too. I provide respite care for a friend of mine who has an eight year old daughter with many challenges. While I admit, the paycheck keeps me motivated week after week, it is a real joy to have this child in my life. We often have challenges to navigate but her developing humor and excitement for simple things make her a delight to be with. So for all you families out there considering the need for respite care rest assured that you are blessing someone else's life as well while they are with your child.

    Reply
  7. 5kidswdisabilities
    October 29, 2012

    What a beautiful family you have!!! Respite care is a great idea, and I'm so happy you found someone to do this.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

I accept the Privacy Policy