The Blind Side – Review

My mom is out of town, so I’m filling in and reviewing the new movie, The Blind Side.

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On a cold night a few days before Thanksgiving of 2002, Leigh Anne Tuohy drove past a 6’ 5” African-American boy. Wearing just shorts and a t-shirt, Michael Oher, or “Big Mike” due to his 350 pound size, was a homeless fifteen year old walking to a gym to stay warm. That night was the start of a new life for Michael, but also for the Tuohys.

This true story of a wealthy Memphis family and the son they adopted was chronicled in the 2006 book, The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game. The movie, starring Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw and Quinton Aaron as Oher, hit theaters last Friday on the eve of National Adoption Day. Part sports drama, comedy and inspirational film, The Blind Side speaks a strong, beautiful and Christian message.

With powerful performances, especially on the part of Bullock, the film is as uplifting as its source material. According to the Tuohys, it is accurate in capturing Michael’s journey from an illiterate and practically abandoned son of a cocaine addict to a 3.5 GPA dean’s list member and first-round pick on the 2009 NFL draft. While there are some truly touching moments, the movie is not gushy or saccharine. This is the kind of movie that grabs your attention at the beginning and doesn’t let go even after the credits roll.

Surprisingly, Hollywood did not try to downplay the Tuohys’ faith. It is clear that they take Michael in because of God, not guilt. Sandra Bullock, after meeting the Tuohys, said, “I now have faith in those who say they represent a faith. I finally met people who walk the walk.” It’s encouraging to see a film as Christian as The Blind Side be successful in mainstream entertainment. While there is a minority of critics who refuse to be moved by this uplifting tale, they are probably the type who enjoy a demoralizing flick like Orphan.

“How many Michael Ohers are there out there? There are thousands of kids out there, one who might be the next great open-heart surgeon or the next president, but we’ve deemed them valueless,” says Leigh Anne Tuohy, encouraging others to get involved personally with those in need. Perhaps that is what is best about the movie: it asks us to make a difference, but by practicing – not preaching. Leigh Anne models what effective compassion looks like; it isn’t just a gooey emotion, but rather a lifestyle of action for the good of others and the glory of God.

Be sure to watch the trailer.
Check out Family Man, a WORLD article about the Tuohys, the book and the movie.

Thanks for reading A Bushel and a Peck andsupporting my mom!
–Rusty

This post may contain Amazon Affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Let me introduce myself. Russ and I are the parents of twelve children by birth and adoption, and sometimes more through foster care. I'm the creator of One Thankful Mom which has been as much of a gift to me as to my readers. In 2011 I became a TBRI® Pracitioner* and have lived and breathed connected parenting ever since. I'm deeply honored to be the co-author, together with the late Dr. Karyn Purvis, of The Connected Parent; it is her final written work. I love speaking at events for adoptive and foster parents. I'm also the co-founder of The Adoption Connection, a podcast and resource site for adoptive moms. I mentor and encourage adoptive moms so you can find courage and hope in your journeys of loving your children well.

0 Comments

  1. Staci
    November 23, 2009

    Thanks Rusty, this movie wasn't on my radar but I am very excited to see it! Your mom is a great example to us all. We love and admire your whole family. Man, tell her to have some guest bloggers more. I bet you all have something great to add. 🙂

    Reply
  2. KT
    November 23, 2009

    Great movie! We went this weekend, the first showing was sold out, so we went to the second, which sold out also. This thrilled me, because there is great potential for people to open their hearts to the idea of foster parenting and adoption through this film!!!

    Reply
  3. Becky
    November 23, 2009

    Rusty, you did a fabulous job of writing that review! Thank you. As I have homeschooling teenagers,and more coming down the road, I would be interested in knowing how you learned to write so well. Did you take classes somewhere, do online classes, or did you have a very good curriculum with a very good teacher (your mom)etc. Your mom is a wonderful writer on her blog, so I am guessing that is how you learned. Your writing is very impressive, and I really would be interested in knowing how you achieved your skill. Thanks, Becky

    Reply
  4. Mark and Sarah
    November 23, 2009

    Great review, Rusty! We watched the movie Saturday night and had similar feelings about the way the Tuohy's were portrayed. Though we were not thrilled with a lot of the racial overtones, we are sadly aware that it is the reality. We (my husband and I) were both moved and feel challenged to get out of our comfort zone a bit more.

    Reply
  5. CAjohnsonfamily
    November 23, 2009

    We read that article in World this week. We can't wait to see the movie!

    Reply
  6. Laurel
    November 23, 2009

    Hey Rusty,

    Great review. Thanks for filling in for your mom.

    We read the article in World magazine, and are looking forward to watching the movie.

    Thanks for being such a great big brother to all the little ones your mom and dad have brought home. They are BLESSED to have such supportive Big Kids, which allows them to follow God's plan for your family.

    Laurel
    mama of 13
    (who also has amazing Big Kids)

    Reply
  7. Cat and Mark
    November 23, 2009

    I'll echo the others – great review! We saw the movie this weekend and loved it. I felt challenged, saddened and hope-filled all at the same time.

    Oh, and let your mom know I gave her a blog award! 🙂

    Reply
  8. Amanda Cox
    November 23, 2009

    Hi Lisa, I gave you a Kreativ blogger award nomination. Details are on my blog if you want to play.
    ~Amanda

    Reply
  9. Thankfulmom
    November 23, 2009

    Mark and Sarah, I'm glad that you enjoyed it. Director/writer John Lee Hancock, in response to several accusations of racism and inappropriate racial slurs ("It's about a black man who can only succeed if a white woman saves him."), said, "Even though there is a racial component, I looked at this story as more of a discussion of haves and have-nots and nature versus nurture. This is a kid who had been discarded by society, especially from an educational standpoint. And his story goes to prove what having a safe bed to sleep in, having a family unit, having loving, interested parents can do. […] Leigh Anne Tuohy didn't stop that car to pick up that kid because he was African-American. She stopped that car to pick up that kid because he was cold."

    Becky, thanks for the compliment! When I was ten, I started taking lessons with my brother Samuel from a local college student. The lessons were very basic creative writing. Before that, we had taken grammar, but I think what was most beneficial was reading through the SonLight curriculum which has many, many fantastic books. This year and last, Samuel and I have been taking rhetoric from another local college student. This includes creative and persuasive writing, logic, fallacies, etc. If you want more specific information on our curriculum, feel free to email my mom.

    –Rusty

    Reply
  10. Jan J.
    November 24, 2009

    Great review, Rusty! I want to go see this but wondering if it would be okay for my kids. They are 12.6 and 12.9, almost 13. I am wondering what makes it PG-13 and if it would be okay with some discussion afterwards to take them. They don't normally see anything past PG but I have let them see a couple of things I prewatched. This is such a wonderful story!

    Reply
  11. Thankfulmom
    November 29, 2009

    Jan, My brother (16) and I (14) saw it with my parents. There may be a couple of scenes that are inappropriate for your kids, but I really couldn't say. Focus on the Family's Plugged In seems to have a pretty fair content review: http://www.pluggedin.com/en/movies/InTheaters/BlindSide.aspx.

    –Rusty

    Reply
  12. Hannahlee
    November 30, 2009

    GREAT review Rusty, I simply can't wait to see it! 🙂

    Reply

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