“Stop! Wait!”

Happy Birthday to Noah who turned 21 yesterday.

Eby has been enjoying painting with watercolors lately and  yesterday he came to me with a painting he wanted to send to his sister, Mesky, in Italy.  That sounded good to me, so he dictated a few sentences for me to add to the picture and put it on my desk.

Our friendly UPS man came to deliver an Amazon box later that day, which is always exciting. As Little Man proudly carried the box up to the house, I heard Eby yell, “Stop!  Wait! Stop!”  The UPS man stopped his truck as Eby raced down the front lawn, the painting clutched in his hand.

Opening Our Arms Wide, and Wider Still

Just when I least expected it, we got an email from Little Man’s first mother.  As I was writing about my own sadness yesterday, and thinking of my friends who share this sorrow, and I was also thinking of Little Man’s first mother.  We hadn’t heard from her in a long time and I was worried.  Was she even alive?  I prayed that we would hear from her, but I’ll be perfectly honest and admit that I didn’t think it would happen any day soon.

"I Distinctly Remember Growing in Your Tummy"

“I distinctly remember growing in your tummy, ” Little Man tipped his head to one side, put his finger in the air and made his point with confidence.

Conversations about where he came from, how we found him, and traveling from Ethiopia to America, are becoming more frequent and I’m doing my best to navigate them.  We talk about his Ethiopian mommy, how much she loved him, and why she took him to the orphanage in Soddo, Ethiopia.  I tell him that Eby was there when he came and they were babies together. He likes to hear the story of the first time we saw him, and how tiny he was as I held him in my arms and gave him a bottle.  

“I Distinctly Remember Growing in Your Tummy”

“I distinctly remember growing in your tummy, ” Little Man tipped his head to one side, put his finger in the air and made his point with confidence.

Conversations about where he came from, how we found him, and traveling from Ethiopia to America, are becoming more frequent and I’m doing my best to navigate them.  We talk about his Ethiopian mommy, how much she loved him, and why she took him to the orphanage in Soddo, Ethiopia.  I tell him that Eby was there when he came and they were babies together. He likes to hear the story of the first time we saw him, and how tiny he was as I held him in my arms and gave him a bottle.  

"I Want to Email My Mommy"

I was sitting at my desk when Little Man and Eby raced into the room.  “We want to message our families,” they shouted.  “I want to talk to my sister,” Eby said and Little Man followed with, “I want to email my Mommy.”

I wasn’t expecting such significant thoughts and I faltered for a moment, especially at Little Man’s words.  We talk about our children’s Ethiopian families regularly but he had never asked to contact his Ethiopian mother.  After being in touch with her for a time, we haven’t heard from her in nearly two years, which worries me.

Tuesday Topic: Returning to Visit First (Birth)Families

I know it isn’t really Tuesday, but I’ve missed posting your questions the last few weeks and decided I would do one today despite it being Wednesday.  My girls had a four day Easter weekend, so it feels like Tuesday to me!

This great question came from Leslie who asked:

Our 7 year-old Ethiopian daughter, K.,  has been with us for a year.  We are in process of adopting a 3 year old boy and hope to travel for court in July.

We are trying to decide whether to take our daughter with us.